Mindfulness

Sunday Morning Musings: What has yoga done for you lately

Sunday mornings are precious in my house as they are leisurely, slow and unstructured. On sunny mornings my yellow walls and oak table turn my kitchen into a sanctuary. Usually there is nothing on my calendar allowing for a leisurely breakfast with my beloved, a savored cup of java (one of my adored vises I will be taking a break from during my upcoming spring detox) and to peruse the Sunday paper. Most of the time my optimistic outlook is unphased by the headlines but today my mindset took a turn toward despair with headlines such as ‘Death toll at 50 in mosque attacks in New Zealand’, “Do-or-Die decision for the Chesapeake Bay’ and ‘Depression rising for the young’. Where has our concern for ourselves and our planet gone, my entire life efforts dedicated to healing, does it make a difference?

‘When despair for the world grows in me’ as Wendell Berry so elegantly describes in his poem ‘The Peace of Wild Things’, a simple stroll to my favorite spot in nature usually does the trick. Most likely a nature connection moment will happen later, but for now off to a yoga class I go. Sometimes the call to be with other like minded souls is stronger then the pull of nature. The soothing sound of the teacher’s voice, the soft music in the background and the slow cadence of our collective breathing allows me to ‘come in the peace of wild things’ and ‘come into the presence of still water’. Even after seventeen years of practicing this ancient art of self care, savasana still allows me to experience ‘For a time to rest in the grace of the world, and am free’. That is what yoga did for me today. What has yoga done for you lately.

Sunday Morning

Sunday Morning

The Alchemy of Compost

Alchemy of Compost | LivingBalanced.org | Photo credit

  A recent meandering through my garden revealed what I thought was a squash plant. Blossoms came, some were eaten by rabbits, some dried up and a few began to bear fruit. I waited patiently for them to grow, looking forward to some end of the season stir fry additions, but instead of squash, mini pumpkins began to emerge. Funny thing though, I had not planted any pumpkin seeds. A pleasant feeling washed over me when I realized these little treats were the result of the decorative pumpkins I tossed into my compost pile last year. 

The process of alchemy that happens in my compost bin has gifted me with not only excellent nutrition for my garden but some little orange surprises as well. Composting physical material makes sense and is ‘good medicine’ for the soil and our air while saving money and landfill space. A similar argument can be made for composting psychological garbage. Carrying around unresolved remnants of our past is wreaking havoc on our mental health, costing millions of dollars in health care, keeping many from living a full life and taking up way too much space in our psyches. I read a story about a therapist who had his clients write down what was bothering them on different rocks. The client then had to carry the rocks around in a sack until finally one day the sack was put down and a declaration uttered, ‘I can’t carry this around any more’. The therapist said, ‘so which ones do you want to take out’.

Composting psychological garbage can be beneficial when we learn how to view the past from another perspective and learning from our experiences. Some of my favorite questions to ask clients when stuck on wishing things were different are: what are my takeaways, what is no longer serving me and what do I want to ‘pay forward’. As spiritual teacher Ram Dass says, ‘everything is grist for the mill’ and no experience is wasted. Rituals around releasing can be helpful, also, and as simple as imagining giving one’s sorrows to the earth or writing them on a piece of paper for burning, burying or placing in moving water. My teachers often say the earth loves to receive your pain, sorrow and suffering for transmuting and recycling. 

Whether concerned about carrying around extra weight from the past or about how much physical garbage is thrown away, adding a practice of composting or releasing to one’s life can be an incredible act of reciprocity. One in which receiving is inherently linked to the act of letting go or giving away.

Ahoe


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